Welcome to the YoungWilliams Research & Case Law Library.  Use the filters below to select categories of interest to you.  Currently our Library consists of academic and government research articles and reports from around the country, federal opinions, and case law from states in which our full service child support projects are located: Colorado, Kansas, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Wyoming.  Sign up to receive updates by clicking the blue  box at the left of the page.

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Research & Case Law

In re Marriage of Peak (Kansas 1989)

April 1989

A child support obligation terminates "when a child goes to live with the other parent" is clarified and restricted to situations where a permanent change of residence is involved.

Hooks v. Hooks (Kansas 1988)

October 1988

A valid judgment for child support arrearages may be collected and enforced in the same manner as any other final judgment.

Clark v. Jeter (Federal, US Supreme Court, 1988)

June 1988

The period for ascertaining the fatherhood of the child must be sufficiently long to permit those who have an interest in the child to bring an action on their behalf despite the personal difficulties that may surround the birth of a child outside of wedlock.

Carroll v. Moore (Nebraska 1988)

May 1988

Court-appointed counsel will be provided to indigent defendants in paternity cases.

Hicks v. Feiock (US 1988)

April 1988

If both civil and criminal relief is imposed in the same action, then the criminal feature of the order is dominant and fixes its character a criminal for purposes of review and burdens of proof.

Rivera v. Minnich (Federal, US Supreme Court, 1987)

June 1987

When paternity actions are brought in court, they are civil in nature. Thus the burden of proof is generally a preponderance of the evidence.

Rose v. Rose (Federal, US Supreme Court, 1987)

May 1987

A state court has jurisdiction to hold a disabled veteran in contempt for failing to pay child support, even if the veteran's only means of satisfying his obligation is to use veteran's benefits received as compensation for a service connected disability.

Rose v. Rose (Federal, US Supreme Court, 1987)

May 1987

Veteran’s Administration Disability payments are considered income and should be used for the satisfaction of child support obligations.

Rose v. Rose (Federal, US Supreme Court, 1987)

May 1987

Veteran’s Administration Disability payments are considered income and should be used for the satisfaction of child support obligations.

Sorenson v. Secretary of the Treasury (Federal, US Supreme Court, 1986)

April 1986

An excess earned-income tax credit will be considered to be an “over-payment” to the Internal Revenue Service and therefore is eligible for a tax intercept by a state child support agency for satisfaction of owed child support payments.

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