Welcome to the YoungWilliams Research & Case Law Library.  Use the filters below to select categories of interest to you.  Currently our Library consists of academic and government research articles and reports from around the country, federal opinions, and case law from states in which our full service child support projects are located: Colorado, Kansas, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Wyoming.  Sign up to receive updates by clicking the blue  box at the left of the page.

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Research & Case Law

To What Extent Do Children Benefit from Child Support?

January 2000

Child support provides a significant source of income for poor families. Child support also reduces the number of poor children by a half million and lessens income inequality among children eligible for it. Unfortunately, about 70 percent of poor children eligible for child support were not getting it in 1996.

Ahearn v. Ahearn (Wyoming 1999)

December 1999

The amount withheld from a father’s pay for deferred compensation is not income under the child support guidelines, because deferred compensation is not a “payment or return in money or in kind” to the father when it is paid into a fund for his later benefit.

Fleenor v. Fleenor (Wyoming 1999)

December 1999

The principal portion of a business mortgage payment may be deductible if, in its discretion, the district court determines that the payment reasonably and legitimately reduces net income for child support purposes.

Groseth v. Groseth (Nebraska 1999)

August 1999

A Nebraska court assumes continuing, exclusive jurisdiction to modify another state’s order once both parents and the child no longer reside in the state that issued the order.

Groseth v. Groseth (Nebraska 1999)

August 1999

A Nebraska court assumes continuing, exclusive jurisdiction to modify another state’s order once both parents and the child no longer reside in the state that issued the order.

Gress v. Gress (Nebraska 1999)

June 1999

A noncustodial parent is entitled to a credit against a monthly child support obligation for Social Security benefits paid to his or her minor child as a result of the non-custodial parent’s disability.

Gress v. Gress (Nebraska 1999)

June 1999

A noncustodial parent is entitled to a credit against a monthly child support obligation for Social Security benefits paid to his or her minor child as a result of the non-custodial parent’s disability.

Overcoming the Barriers to Collection Final Report

June 1999

This report summarizes findings of a Washington State Child Support research project entitled Child Support Performance Measurements: A Test for Working Hard-to-Collect Cases. The goal of the project was to find out whether increased collections on challenging cases would improve performance in the five federally measured areas.

Roseman v. Sackett (Wyoming 1999)

May 1999

A non-custodial parent has the responsibility of showing that business deductions are reasonable and appropriate.

The Effect of Child Support and Self-Sufficiency Programs on Reducing Direct Support Public Costs

May 1999

This report examines cost avoidance of government funded programs attributable to regular child support income. While the report examines cost avoidance in Washington State, the methodology could be used by other states.

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